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Wells-next-the-Sea Lifeboat Station

Wells-next-the-Sea Lifeboat Station is an RNLI operated lifeboat station located in the town of Wells-next-the-Sea in the English county of Norfolk cheap water bottles. The station operates both inshore and offshore lifeboats. The inshore boat is called Jane Ann III (D-661) and is a D-class (IB1) lifeboat, whilst the offshore boat is called Doris M, Mann of Ampthill (ON 1161), and is a Mersey class lifeboat. The station boathouse is located at the beach on the western side of Wells Harbour mouth.

The earliest attempts at rescue at sea in the Wells area were performed by the Beachmen or Longshoremen who formed their own Beachmen’s company at Wells, and used a fast sailing yawl to rescue and salvage distressed vessels along this part of the coast. However this was done to the benefit of both parties. On reaching a distressed vessel, the beachmen could claim right of salvage and with this in mind there would be a negotiation were terms of employment were settled with the beachmen often driving home a hard bargain. The beachmen’s work was arduous and fraught with danger, and on many occasions they earned nothing at all.

The first organised rescue service at Wells was run by the Norfolk Shipwreck Association and began in 1830 when an existing lifeboat that had been at Cromer was sent to Wells. The boat had no name but was of the Greathead or North Country non self-righter type. It was a pulling lifeboat and was powered with ten oars.

By the 1860s the lifeboat operation run by the Norfolk Shipwreck Association had fallen into a rapid decline with no lifeboat stationed at Wells wholesale white socks, whilst at this same time there was a marked increase in the number of maritime incidents of the shores of North Norfolk. In 1868 the newly formed RNLI was approached by the local townsfolk to see if they would re-organise the lifeboat service in the town. The RNLI sent an inspector to the town and he reported back to the institutes Committee of Management recommending the setting up of an organised lifeboat service in the town. The RNLI agreed with his findings and put plans into action. A new self-righting lifeboat of the latest design was ordered for the town. To accommodate the new lifeboat the construction of a substantial new boathouse was begun. The new station was on the quay close to the town. The building was opened in 1869, along with the new lifeboat. The lifeboat was a 33-foot self-righting type and was called RNLB Eliza Adams. This lifeboat house was used until 1895 when the service was re-located at the far end of Beach Road. The Grade II listed building still stands and is used jointly as the harbour Masters Office and a Maritime Museum.

In the latter part of the 1800s it was becoming clear to the local lifeboatmen that there station was not in the most useful location and was more than a mile from the open sea. The problem was highlighted in 1893 when the lifeboat RNLB Baltic (ON 198) was launched to service on three occasions and failed to effect any rescues. The collier Duke of Cornwall was wrecked east of Wells, fortunately without loss of life. In the same day the barge Lord Beresford was driven ashore at Holkham beach with her crew rescued from the rigging without any help from the lifeboat. The third failure occurred two days later when the schooner Hickman went ashore at Wells Bar. Most of the crew were eventually rescued but two of the crew died of exposure after taking to the rigging. The struggling lifeboat was beached and two of her crew were washed overboard but were rescued. The problem was that at low water the lifeboat could not get out into the open sea and relied on the rise and fall of the tide to much. Even with a favourable tide if the wind was against the lifeboat it effectively was trapped in the Harbour.

To remedy the location problem the RNLI acquired some land 1.2 miles (1.9 km) north of the existing station on the western point overlooking the harbour mouth. Work began on the new station in 1894 but due to delays the station was not ready until October 1895. The previouse problems had also highlighted the Baltic’s shortfalls and the station was supplied with a more efficient lifeboat. The new lifeboat was of a type which the Wells crew had a preference for. The new boat was a Cromer Self-righting type built by Beeching Bros of Great Yarmouth. The new lifeboat arrived on station in July 1895 and she was called RNLB Baltic (ON 375) and was a pulling lifeboat with 14 oars. Whilst on the station she was launched to service a total of 13 times and she is credited with saving 19 lives.

Although the RNLI had been considering the idea of providing Wells with a motor lifeboat since 1911, it was not until July 1936 that the station was provided with one. This was because of the launching situation at Wells and the need for carriage launched motor lifeboat to be designed. The Surf-class lifeboat was designed by James Barnett and was light enough for the beach launch required at Wells. RNLB Royal Silver Jubilee (ON 780) was also the first Surf-class to be propelled by Hotchkiss Cone propulsion system which was a basic water jet system. This system of propulsion was ideal for conditions at Wells, where the water is very shallow at times and combined with her comparative lightness and shallow draught made her ideal for when the tide is fully out, and the lifeboat required to be taken out several miles to be launched.

By the mid 1960s this area of the North Norfolk coast had seen an increase of pleasure craft and beach leisure activities. The RNLI saw a change in the pattern of casualties with an increasing number of services required to rescue bathers washed out to sea, people on lilos, dinghies, and various small water craft. It was realised locally that a faster first response was needed to attend such situations and to relieve the Wells all weather lifeboat RNLB Cecil Paine (ON 850) from the inshore workload. In 1963 the inshore service was established and a small boathouse was erected adjacent to the west of the main boat hall at Beach Road. The first inshore boat was a D-class (IB1) with the operation number D-11 which served for the first year of the inshore operations. This boat was followed by a succession of D-class boats. The first to have a name was Spirit of Rotary (D-246), and she was on the station from 1976 until 1987. In January 1978 a severe storm destroyed the IRB house and damaged the doors to the main boathall. A new IRB house was built onto the side of the main station.

The beach road station, over the years, has been improved and renovated on several occasions, to keep the facilities at their optimal state of purpose. Much of the stations original 1895 structure is the major integral part of the building. The crew facilities were expanded in 1983 by building a first floor above the ILB house previously added to the side of the station. A boathouse extension was added on to the back of the station in 1986. This improvement was necessary to house the inshore lifeboat. The new Talus MB-H T99 tractor which was supplied to improve the launch equipment for the lifeboats was then housed in the old inshore lifeboat house, which also had to be enlarged and altered.

In 1990 the station was allocated a new Mersey-class lifeboat. She was called Doris M. Mann of Ampthill and she became operational on the 3 July of that year. To accommodate this new lifeboat the station once again had to be considerably enlarged and altered. The house had to be almost completely re-built whilst still retaining the historic integrity of the 1895 station. In the mid 1990s work was also carried out to the outside environment of the station. Work was carried out on the timber revetments and groynes to prevent further coastal erosion of the sandy headland on which the boat house is located. This was achieved by re-using the Greenheart timbers re-claimed after the demolishion of the Eastbourne slipway. Extra new groynes were also installed to retain the beach in front of the station, vital for the continued beach launching of the lifeboats

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With the Wells station barely large enough to house the lifeboats and all their necessary equipment, space is at a premium. Unfortunately the station has no separate public area or viewing gallery, but is still open for public visitation. The situation gives the visitor a different, and up close experience with the station but with the necessity for extra care to be taken when moving around the open areas. There is a gift shop and information area but this has limited open hours in the summer and when there are specific events and visits are organised.

In 1979 the station became the subject of an iconic photograph. The photograph named The Rescue Team was taken by Campbell MacCallum. The photo was conceived as a poster project just for display in the crew room of the station. The composition of the photograph included the Oakley-class motor lifeboat RNLB Ernest Tom Nethercoat (ON 982), The inshore lifeboat, the lifeboat crews, officials, supporters, fund-raisers and the local coastguards. The RNLI Headquarters in Poole were given a copy of the photograph and were very impressed. The RNLI requested that they might use the poster to distributor to all its stations and to use as a fund raiser. The photograph was renamed Portrait of a Lifeboat Station and was distributed to all RNLI stations, branches, guilds, Armed Forces, Educational authorities, and many other organisations worldwide. The poster was even sighting on the wall of a 24hr Tailor in downtown Hong Kong. In 1986 the same format was used to produce another poster but this time using the Hastings lifeboat. Wells was chosen in again in 1993 and again in 2000 for the “Millennium Rescue Team” poster.

On 29 October 1880, gales were lashing the north coast of Norfolk. The 171 ton Ocean Queen, of Sunderland was on passage from Southampton to Seaham when she was caught in the storm and sought shelter at Wells-next-the-Sea. At 1:00pm, the Wells lifeboat RNLB Eliza Adams launched to the aid of another brig, the Sharon Rose, which had run ashore on the beach at nearby Holkham. Seven sailors were rescued from the vessel and the lifeboat returned safely to Wells. However, on arrival back to the quay, the Ocean Queen was seen close to the harbour entrance, flying a distress flag.

After changing 8 of her 13 crew, the Eliza Adams was again towed to sea. By this stage the Ocean Queen had been driven ashore on the nearby sands. The lifeboat reached the brig, but was unable to help and so set sail to return to port hydration running. In so doing, a heavy wave broke over the lifeboat and it capsized. The crew of the Ocean Queen remained aboard their vessel, and were able to walk ashore once the storm had abated and the tide receded.

Eleven of the 13 crew drowned, leaving 10 widows and 27 children without a father. One crew member, William Bell, managed to stay with the boat until it righted itself. Another, Thomas Kew, was washed ashore alive. A memorial to the members of the Wells lifeboat crew who lost their lives stands adjacent to the old lifeboat house.

On the 4 October 1883 the coastline of Wells-next-the-Sea was being lashed by a heavy north-easterly gale. The lifeboat RNLB Charlotte Nicholls was launched to service in heavy seas. The schooner Emma of Jersey had been blown onto the East Bar and had become stranded. With coxswain Horace Hinson at the helm, the lifeboat arrived to find the schooner’s sails torn, her bulwarks washed away and the heavy sea crashing over the deck. There were five crew aboard of which one was a boy and all were tired and suffering from hypothermia. The lifeboat took all five aboard and landed them safely back at Wells.

Over the 18 and 19 May 1963 the cabin cruiser Seamu of Frinton had run aground at low tide at the entrance to Blakeney harbour. The Wells lifeboat RNLB Cecil Paine (ON 850) was launched to service with coxswain Francis Taylor at the helm. The lifeboat arrived at the scene at 10.50 pm, the sea was rough and a strong west-north-west breeze was continuing. Coxswain Taylor made an approach to the stricken vessel but progress was halted by a sandbank. He then started further attempts to approach and by now the wind had strengthened to a near gale force. After four approaches the lifeboat finally got alongside and the lifeboatmen dragged the two crew from the cruiser aboard the lifeboat and to safety. The lifeboat was back at the Wells Station by 3.15 am. For his part in the rescue coxswain Taylor was awarded a Bronze medal.

On the morning of 15 February 1979 the weather was atrocious with a gale force nine to storm force ten blowing blizzard conditions across the north sea. In these freezing conditions the Wells lifeboat Ernest Tom Neathercoat was launched to service that morning. The Merchant Vessel Savinesti of Romania had broken down and was dragging her anchor and was in imminent danger of running aground 37 miles (60 km) south-west of Spurn Point. The lifeboat struggled to make headway through huge seas and temperatures well below freezing. The Ernest Tom Neathercoat had lost her radar, MF radio and echo-sounder, all knocked out by the continuous battering of the seas. Overcoming these difficulties, she eventually arrived at the scene and she stood by the Savinesti until the expected arrival of the Humber Arun-class lifeboat RNLB City of Bradford IV (ON 1052), which was to take over the service. The Humber lifeboat had slipped her moorings at 11.24am that same morning. The Wells lifeboat stood by the Savinesti for over two hours before the larger Humber lifeboat arrived. The lifeboat crew during this wait had been up to their waist in seawater in the open exposed Oakley lifeboat. The storm had also increased from gale force eleven to hurricane force twelve. The waves had been up to 40 feet high and it was continuous heavy snow. By the time the Humber lifeboat was close by the Wells lifeboat had been joined at the scene the coastal tanker Annuity and the North Sea ferry Norwave which flanked the Savinesti. At this time the Wells lifeboat was released from the service and sent on her way back home with the intention of using what was left of the daylight to get back to Wells. In terrible conditions the tired, cold crew and their boat got back to Wells between six and seven pm. In what he described as The worst trip I’ve ever had coxswain David Cox was awarded an RNLI silver medal. The rest of the crew, two of whom had suffered frostbite during the eleven hours at sea, were awarded service certificates.

Gordevio

Gordevio was a municipality in the district of Vallemaggia in the canton of Ticino in Switzerland. On 20 April 2008, Avegno and Gordevio merged to form Avegno Gordevio.

Gordevio is first mentioned in 1200 as de gordauio. In 1335 it was mentioned as de Gordavio

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The parish church of SS Giacomo e Filippo, is first mentioned in the 13th Century. The current building was built in the 17th Century on the remains of a previous church from the 14th Century. It contains paintings by Giovanni Antonio Vanoni (19th Century) and probably by Giuseppe Antonio Felice Orelli, who created frescoes in the adjacent ossuary in 1753. In village of Brièè, in 1666, the chapel of S. Antonio Abate was built. In the 14th Century both Gordevio and Avegno had their own chaplain. The two villages broke away from the mother church in Maggia, and parted from each other probably about 1645.

The village center of contains some houses from the 19th Century. Due to lack of farming land, emigration (at first mainly to Rome, but in the second half of the 19th Century overseas as well) lowered the number of inhabitants. In the last decades of the 20th Century, the population has risen again. This increase is mainly due to its proximity to agglomeration of Locarno. Agricultural jobs have practically disappeared from the village.

The village is located in the Vallemaggia district. It consists of two sections, Villa and Brièè, which are separated by the Ri di Gèi stream.

The blazon of the municipal coat of arms is Per bend gules two fleurs de lis argent and of the last a cross pattee per saltire azure and of the first and overall a bendlet of the third.

Gordevio has a population (As of December 2004) of 812. Most of the population (as of 2000) speaks Italian language (675 or 84.6%), with German being second most common (80 or 10.0%) and French being third (29 or 3.6%)

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. There are 3 people who speak Romansh.

Of the population in the village 305 or about 38.2% were born in Gordevio and lived there in 2000. There were 236 or 29.6% who were born in the same canton, while 115 or 14.4% were born somewhere else in Switzerland, and 100 or 12.5% were born outside of Switzerland. As of 2000, there were 346 people who were single and never married in the village. There were 354 married individuals, 58 widows or widowers and 40 individuals who are divorced.

There were 59 households that consist of only one person and 24 households with five or more people. Out of a total of 274 households that answered this question, 21.5% were households made up of just one person and 7 were adults who lived with their parents. Of the rest of the households, there are 64 married couples without children, 104 married couples with children There were 26 single parents with a child or children. There were 12 households that were made up unrelated people and 2 households that were made some sort of institution or another collective housing.

In 2000 there were 260 single-family homes (or 78.5% of the total) out of a total of 331 inhabited buildings. There were 64 multi-family buildings (19.3%), along with 4 multi-purpose buildings that were mostly used for housing (1.2%) and 3 other use buildings (commercial or industrial) that also had some housing (0.9%). Of the single-family homes 12 were built before 1919, while 10 were built between 1990 and 2000. The greatest number of single-family homes (84) were built between 1919 and 1945.

In 2000 there were 422 apartments in the village. The most common apartment size was 4 rooms of which there were 112. There were 18 single room apartments and 122 apartments with five or more rooms. Of these apartments, a total of 270 apartments (64.0% of the total) were permanently occupied, while 142 apartments (33.6%) were seasonally occupied and 10 apartments (2.4%) were empty.

The historical population is given in the following chart:

In the 2007 federal election the most popular party was the SP which received 27.17% of the vote. The next three most popular parties were the CVP (26.51%), the FDP (21.86%) and the Ticino League (13.94%). In the federal election, a total of 262 votes were cast, and the voter turnout was 45.5%.

In the 2007 Gran Consiglio election, there were a total of 576 registered voters in Gordevio, of which 358 or 62.2% voted. 3 blank ballots were cast, leaving 355 valid ballots in the election. The most popular party was the PS which received 88 or 24.8% of the vote. The next three most popular parties were; the PPD+GenGiova (with 85 or 23.9%), the SSI (with 73 or 20.6%) and the LEGA (with 44 or 12.4%).

In the 2007 Consiglio di Stato election, 4 blank ballots and 1 null ballot were cast, leaving 353 valid ballots in the election. The most popular party was the PS which received 97 or 27.5% of the vote. The next three most popular parties were; the PPD (with 88 or 24.9%), the LEGA (with 73 or 20.7%) and the SSI (with 50 or 14.2%).

There were 318 residents of the village who were employed in some capacity, of which females made up 41.2% of the workforce. In 2000, there were 86 workers who commuted into the village and 226 workers who commuted away. The village is a net exporter of workers, with about 2.6 workers leaving the village for every one entering. About 14.0% of the workforce coming into Gordevio are coming from outside Switzerland.

From the 2000 census, 632 or 79.2% were Roman Catholic, while 52 or 6.5% belonged to the Swiss Reformed Church. Of the rest of the population, there were 2 members of an Orthodox church (or about 0.25% of the population), and there was 1 individual who belongs to another Christian church. There was 1 individual who was Islamic. 80 (or about 10.03% of the population) belonged to no church, are agnostic or atheist, and 30 individuals (or about 3.76% of the population) did not answer the question

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In Gordevio about 313 or (39.2%) of the population have completed non-mandatory upper secondary education, and 77 or (9.6%) have completed additional higher education (either University or a Fachhochschule). Of the 77 who completed tertiary schooling, 55.8% were Swiss men, 37.7% were Swiss women. As of 2000, there were 3 students in Gordevio who came from another village, while 105 residents attended schools outside the village.

Down Street (metropolitana di Londra)

Coordinate:

Down Street, anche conosciuta come Down Street (Mayfair), è una stazione fantasma della metropolitana di Londra, ubicata a Mayfair, nel centro della città. Inaugurata nel 1907 dalla Great Northern, Piccadilly and Brompton Railway, lo scalo faceva parte della Piccadilly line ed era compreso fra Dover Street (oggi Green Park) e Hyde Park Corner.

La stazione non è mai stata molto frequentata, tanto che spesso i treni non vi si fermavano. Il movimento passeggeri pressoché minimo e la vicinanza ad altre fermate hanno contribuito alla sua chiusura definitiva, avvenuta nel 1932. La struttura è stata poi comunque convertita durante la seconda guerra mondiale in un bunker governativo da parte di Winston Churchill.

La stazione è situata a Down Street a Mayfair, a poca distanza da Piccadilly e da Hyde Park. Venne inaugurata dalla Great Northern, Piccadilly and Brompton Railway (GNP&BR; il precursore dell’odierna Piccadilly line) il 15 marzo 1907, alcuni mesi dopo l’entrata in servizio dell’intera linea. Il ritardo si verificò a causa di alcune problematiche sorte per l’esproprio dei terreni circostanti l’edificio e per concordare una disposizione sicura dei vari corridoi sotterranei con il Board of Trade. Il fabbricato viaggiatori venne progettato da Leslie Green, architetto dell’Underground Electric Railways Company of London (UERL); Green previde una palazzina a due piani, con grandi aperture ad archi a tutto sesto ed una facciata in terracotta bordeaux smaltata. La stazione disponeva anche di un paio di ascensori Otis

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, che portavano alle banchine ubicate 22.2 metri al di sotto del piano stradale.

Down Street non ha mai conosciuto un gran movimento passeggeri, visto che l’area circostante era prevalentemente residenziale ed i potenziali fruitori, essendo abbastanza facoltosi, preferivano viaggiare con mezzi di trasporto privati. Inoltre, vi erano numerose altre stazioni nelle immediate circostanze, come Dover Street (550 m a est) e Hyde Park Corner (500 m ad ovest). Per queste ragioni, dal 1909 molti treni saltarono questa stazione

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; addirittura, a partire dal 1918, quest’ultima era chiusa di domenica.

Nel 1929 emerse l’ipotesi di chiudere la stazione in un progetto di estensione della Piccadilly line. Quest’ultimo prevedeva una sorte analoga anche con altre fermate del centro sottoutilizzate; ciò avrebbe velocizzato non di poco i viaggi, rendendo più affidabile il servizio. Per di più con l’introduzione delle scale mobili nella metropolitana di Londra, vennero costruite altre uscite che erano ancora più vicine a Down Street, riducendo ulteriormente il bacino d’utenza. Con queste premesse, la stazione venne chiusa definitivamente il 21 maggio 1932 Runner Waist.

La stazione venne convertita in un rifugio antiaereo, secondo un programma che vedeva la creazione di strutture per la protezione del Governo britannico dai bombardamenti aerei nazisti. A questo scopo vennero murati gli accessi alle banchine, mentre le discenderie vennero trasformate in uffici, sale congressi e dormitori. L’appalto del lavoro strutturale venne consegnato al London Passenger Transport Board, mentre l’arredamento degli ambienti e l’implementazione delle apparecchiature per l’energia elettrica e le comunicazioni venne garantita dalla London, Midland and Scottish Railway. In aggiunta a ciò, vennero anche installati un ascensore accessibile a due persone, una centrale telefonica ed i servizi igienici. Gli spazi erano occupati prevalentemente dalla Railway Executive Committee, ma vennero usati anche da Winston Churchill ed erano potenzialmente fruibili anche dalle Cabinet War Rooms. Churchill era solito soprannominare la stazione «il granaio» (The Barn).

Oggi la stazione viene utilizzata solo come uscita d’emergenza della metropolitana di Londra.

Down Street compare come luogo nel libro Nessun dove, dove fornisce l’accesso ad un labirinto sotterraneo. È presente anche nel videogioco Shadow Man, anche se in una versione molto più estesa e modificata.

Parte del film horror britannico Creep – Il chirurgo è ambientata nella stazione, anche se il set è stato un’altra stazione fantasma della metrò londinese, Aldwych. Inoltre, vi è una canzone che si intitola proprio «Down Street», inclusa nell’album Catfight rilasciato dagli Hefner nel 2006: parla di due amanti che si sono conosciuti proprio nella fermata. Anche nell’album Wild Orchids di Steve Hackett vi figura una canzone che si chiama Down Street.

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Wilson Fittipaldi

Wilson Fittipaldi Júnior (San Paolo del Brasile, 25 dicembre 1943) è un ex pilota di Formula 1 brasiliano di origini italiane (ed esattamente lucane), fratello del due volte Campione del Mondo Emerson e padre di Christian Fuzz Remover.

Wilson Fittipaldi entrò in contatto con il mondo delle corse negli anni sessanta, guidando i kart. Successivamente il brasiliano passò alla Formula Vee.

Mossosi verso l’Europa nel 1966 per disputare il campionato di F3 inglese non riuscì a prendervi parte per contrasti con il suo team in Brasile.

Nel 1970 il pilota tornò in Inghilterra per correre in Formula 3. L’anno seguente passò poi alla Formula 2, ottenendo discreti risultati che gli valsero una chiamata dalla Brabham in Formula 1 per il 1972

Wilson esordì nella massima serie al Gran premio di Spagna nel 1972 alla guida di una Brabham, chiamato a sostituire Carlos Reutemann. Concluse la sua prima gara al settimo posto e vi rimase per tutta la stagione senza ottenere punti in gare valide per il mondiale.

Per la stagione 1973 rimase alla Brabham nelle vesti di secondo pilota, e conquistò tre punti, ma venne surclassato dal compagno di squadra, Reutemann appunto.

Nel 1974 Wilson si prese una pausa, tornando nel 1975 con una sua scuderia: la Copersucar, ma deludenti risultati lo indussero ad abbandonare il mondo della F1, lasciando il team al più noto fratello Emerson.

Terminata la carriera in F1 Wilson ritornò occasionalmente alla guida di vetture nella serie brasiliana delle Stock Cars, ottenendo anche qualche buon risultato

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. Si è per lo più dedicato alla carriera di manager, soprattutto negli anni novanta nel periodo in cui il figlio Christian mosse i primi passi nel mondo delle corse.

Dal 2004 Fittipaldi è direttore tecnico della WB Motorsports scuderia brasiliana del campionato Stock Cars.

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Hypertrophic osteoarthropathy

Hypertrophic osteoarthropathy (also known as Hypertrophic pulmonary osteoarthropathy, Bamberger-Marie syndrome or Osteoarthropathia hypertrophicans) is a medical condition combining clubbing and periostitis of the small hand joints, especially the distal interphalangeal joints. Distal expansion of the long bones as well as painful

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, swollen joints and synovial villous proliferation are often seen. The condition may occur alone (primary), or it may be secondary to diseases like lung cancer. It is especially associated with non-small cell lung carcinoma. These patients often get clubbing and increased bone deposition on long bones. Their presenting symptoms are sometimes only clubbing and painful ankles

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Hypertrophic osteoarthropathy is one of many distant effect disorders due to cancer, with lung cancer being the most common cause but also occurring with ovarian or adrenal malignancies. A distant effect disorder

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, or a paraneoplastic syndrome, affects distant areas and thus is not related to local compression or obstruction effects from the tumor. Other paraneoplastic syndromes include hypercalcemia, SIADH, Cushing’s syndrome and a variety of neurological disorders.

It is named for Eugen von Bamberger and Pierre Marie.