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The Empty Closet

The Empty Closet is a free newspaper published by the University of Rochester Gay Liberation Front and the Gay Alliance of the Genesee Valley

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, based in Rochester hermes tassen outlet, New York. The motto of the Gay Alliance of the Genesee Valley is “Champions for LGBTQ life & culture in Rochester, NY,” and The Empty Closet reports on issues of interest to the local and national LGBTQ and allied communities.

The Empty Closet began publication in January 1971 by student activists attending the University of Rochester. It is one of the longest continually published newspapers in the United States focusing on the LGBT community.
In February, 2011, the New York State Senate passed Resolution K130-2011, “Commemorating the 40th Anniversary of The Empty Closet,” noting the contributions of the newspaper to creating an atmosphere of social tolerance in the Rochester region: “This progressive paper has been a powerful tool in documenting the social, political, religious

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, cultural, artistic, business and literary history and events for the GLBT community of Rochester and surrounding areas.”

Windsor Town Quarry Park and Tramways Substation No. 6

Windsor Town Quarry Park and Tramways Substation No. 6 is a heritage-listed former quarry with electrical substation at 356 Lutwyche Road, Windsor in the City of Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. It was built from c. 1926 to c. 1928. The park and substation were added to the Queensland Heritage Register on 31 May 2005. There is another, larger substation building, Tramways Substation No. 13 which was designed by Frank Gibson Costello and became operational in June 1949.

A seam of Brisbane tuff, known locally as “porphyry”, forms part of the Enoggera fault line and was formed by being deposited on the shore and in the shallow waters of small Triassic lakes. This stone was found to be suitable for building in the early stages of European settlement in Queensland. The original hill of the Windsor quarry sloped across Lutwyche Road and down to Albion Road. Nehemiah Bartley acquired the land in the first land sales in 1859, though he sold it in the mid 1860s. Stone was probably removed first in the 1860s as the hill was lowered to allow development of a road, though in the 1870s it still formed a hump in the road and vehicles tended to drive around it.
The Ithaca Divisional Board was formed in 1879 and quarried stone from the hill. In 1887 Windsor became a Shire and the quarry was transferred to it in 1888. The local tuff provided an excellent source of building material for the new Shire and districts beyond and was worked by both private enterprise and the town council. In 1897, the Windsor Town Council Chambers was constructed from the stone, as were a number of local buildings, roadside kerbing and drains. The stonemason’s office stood near the corner of Haddock Street at the base of the hill.
In 1904 Windsor became a municipality comprising Albion, Wooloowin, Wilston, Lutwyche, Newmarket, Swan Hill and part of Eagle Junction and Kedron. A stone crushing plant was constructed at the quarry in 1914 and the road metal produced greatly facilitated road development in the area. By the 1920s the quarry is thought to have been largely worked out and quarrying may not have continued beyond the establishment of the substation in 1927.
The Brisbane City Council works department used the quarry floor as a depot for some years before it was redeveloped as a park. It was gazetted for this purpose on 1 August 1976 and was redeveloped as a park in 1988. The quarry face that remains today displays an unconformity between the metamorphic Neranleigh-Fernvale beds of rock and the Brisbane tuff seam and is a striking feature of the park.
The former Brisbane City Council Tramways Substation no 6 was operational between 1927 and 1948 and is situated adjacent to an open parkland area created from a former quarry at Windsor.
The Metropolitan Tramway and Investment Co. Ltd operated horse-drawn trams in Brisbane from August 1885. The first public supply of electricity in Brisbane was from a generator in Edison Lane, which supplied the General Post Office in 1888. Early development in the industry was in the hands of a number of private companies and the situation was complex because the metropolitan area comprised fourteen separate local authorities. After various liquidations and restructurings, the City Electric Light Company Limited (CEL) was established in 1904. Parallel development took place in electric traction. The Brisbane Tramways Company, a private enterprise formed in 1895, introduced the first electric trams to Brisbane in 1897 after purchasing the early horse car system, converting it to electric operation and expanding and extending the routes. A power station to supply current to the electric trams was constructed in Countess Street in 1897.
As the tramway system extended out into the suburbs, this power station was unable to provide all the energy needed. Two engine sets from Countess Street were transferred to a building in Logan Road to provide a feeding point for the system on the south side of the river. Supply was also fed from the tramway 550-volt DC mains to a number of establishments along the tramway routes, such as butcher shops, sawmills and factories. By 1918, the whole of the tramways public power supply equipment in South Brisbane was sold to the City Electric Light Company, which developed a supply for South Brisbane from its power station in William Street. At the conclusion of the First World War there was general support for the notion that the tramway system should be owned and operated by a public authority. In 1922, an Act of Parliament inaugurated the Brisbane Tramway Trust.
In 1925 the many small local authorities were amalgamated into the Greater Brisbane City Council, creating a single public authority that could plan for the provision of electrical services throughout the entire city. Expansion of electricity supply and the development of better public transport networks were important issues for the Council and were closely linked to suburban development. At this time energy generation and supply was chaotic. Three small obsolete power stations generated energy for trams and electricity for Ithaca and Toowong and the supply for all other suburbs was purchased in bulk from CEL under 10 year agreements.
The 1920s and 1930s was a period of tramways expansion following the Greater Brisbane Council’s acquisition of the tramways system from the Brisbane Tramways Trust in 1925. In 1926 the Council, anxious to control the city’s electricity supply, decided to build its own powerhouse at New Farm, under the supervision of the BCC Tramways Department. Opened on 28 June 1928, New Farm Power Station distributed 1100 KW AC power to a network of 10 suburban tramways substations erected in the 1920s and 1930s.
The substations were located at strategic points throughout the system – substations No. 2 (Russell Street) and No. 6 (Windsor) came into service in 1927, No. 4 (Petrie Terrace) and No. 5 (Newstead) in 1928; Substation No. 9 (Norman Park) came on line in 1935.
Prior to 1940, their design was the responsibility of BCC Tramways Department architect and construction engineer hermes tassen outlet, Roy Rusden Ogg. In conjunction with the tramway’s chief engineers Nelson and Arundell, he designed 10 Brisbane substations between 1926 and 1936 and the first two stages of the New Farm powerhouse.
Dates sourced from Brisbane City Council Archives
Considerable attention was given to the design of the substations serving the tramway system. The architecture was marked by the stylistic preferences of the individual architects, the Brisbane City Tramways architect Roy Rusden Ogg and later City Architect Frank Gibson Costello. Although they were robust utility buildings, generally small in scale, elegant proportions and such details as finely crafted brickwork distinguished them.
The former Brisbane City Council Tramways Substation at Windsor is the smallest of the substations designed by Ogg. Ogg also designed the Tramways Departments Head Office building on Coronation Drive in 1929.
It proved too small to accommodate the requirements of the expanding network and was replaced in 1948 by a larger substation to the design of City Architect Frank Gibson Costello, Tramways Substation No. 13 located to the south of the reserve.
After its decommissioning the building was used as a chemical store for the Department of Health and Community Services Entomological and Rodent Control Section and now accommodates an assortment of equipment and chemicals. Material related to its use as a substation was donated to Windsor and District Historical Society. The roof was re-sheeted in 1985 and new rainwater goods installed. Landscaping has been carried out around the building.
Tramways Substation No. 13 which was designed by Frank Gibson Costello and became operational in June 1949, and appears to also be within the Windsor Town Quarry Park, but is on separate lot, which is an electricity reserve managed by Energex.
The former Brisbane City Council Tramway Substation No. 6 and Windsor Town Quarry Park occupy an irregular block that is part of an island of land, bounded by Goodacre and Flaherty Streets and Lutwyche Road, that also contains the former Windsor Shire Council Chambers, the Hawkins Street road reserve and a former Energex substation on separate lots.
The quarry face to the western side dominates the park. This sheer rock wall is topped by a brilliant splash of bougainvillea, which adds to its landmark qualities. It rises abruptly from a level grassed area. A path runs throughs the park on a north–south axis. Recently constructed sandstone clad gateposts mark the entrance from Lutwyche Road. Bedded out plantings edge the park along Lutwyche Road and there are also plantings of ornamental trees scattered about the park.
There is a small, asphalted car park to the south and the former tramways substation is at the northern end of the park close to Lutwyche Road. It is a two-storey building of austere appearance, symmetrical in form, and has load-bearing walls of red glazed bricks set on a concrete plinth. The roof is hipped and is clad with modern coated metal sheeting. The front of the building is divided into bays by brick pilasters and has a decorative cornice of moulded render with small square openings set below wide eaves. The front entrance is placed centrally below a square window set with multiple panes of glass. There are fixed rectangular windows of similar style in the flanking bays and on the sides of the substation. These windows are steel framed and have exterior mesh security grilles. The doors to the front and side of the building have metal roller shutters. There is a later addition in the form of a single story skillion roofed section to the rear to which a brick toilet has been added.
The interior of the substation is painted and the ceilings are clad in fibrous cement sheeting with timber battens. The floors are concrete and there is a suspended mezzanine floor accessed by a steel ladder. The internal space is divided by a brick wall, which has a doorway at the northern end and an opening adjacent to the site of the rectifier at the southern end. Marks on the rear section show where the AC and DC cubicles have been removed.
The steel gantry survives and appears to be functional. Any remaining evidence for machinery mountings on the floor are obscured by timber flooring in the transformer room and material stored in the rectifier room. Marks and fixings on walls indicated where equipment was once attached.
BCC Tramways Substation No. 6 and Windsor Town Quarry Park (former) was listed on the Queensland Heritage Register on 31 May 2005 having satisfied the following criteria.
The place is important in demonstrating the evolution or pattern of Queensland’s history.
The former tramway substation is important in demonstrating a vital aspect of Queensland’s industrial development and is closely linked to Brisbane’s suburban expansion in the 1920s and 30s and with the development of the electricity supply system. The exposed face of the former quarry, now the main feature of the park between the substation and Windsor Shire Council Chambers, is evidence for the former industrial use of the site as a source of stone for buildings and road construction.
The place demonstrates rare, uncommon or endangered aspects of Queensland’s cultural heritage.
The former substation is now uncommon evidence for an important mode of transport, which was discontinued in Brisbane in 1969 and for which much of the infrastructure has since been removed. The quarry wall has an inclined fault where Brisbane tuff meets phyllite, which is significant as a geological rarity.
The place is important in demonstrating the principal characteristics of a particular class of cultural places.
In design, scale and materials, the former substation is important in demonstrating the principal characteristics of the Brisbane tramways substations. Due to the quality of its design and materials it successfully combines function with a pleasing appearance.
As a well-conceived utility structure, the substation is important as a fine example of the municipal work of tramways architect Roy Rusden Ogg.
The place is important because of its aesthetic significance.
As the substation and the adjoining park with its landmark quarry cliff are prominently sited on a major road, they make an important contribution to the visual character of the area. The quarry face, in particular, is a landmark that is emphasised by being floodlit at night.
The place has a special association with the life or work of a particular person, group or organisation of importance in Queensland’s history.
As a well-conceived utility structure, the substation is important as a fine example of the municipal work of tramways architect Roy Rusden Ogg.
This Wikipedia article was originally based on “The Queensland heritage register” published by the State of Queensland under CC-BY 3.0 AU licence (accessed on 7 July 2014, archived on 8 October 2014). The geo-coordinates were originally computed from the “Queensland heritage register boundaries” published by the State of Queensland under CC-BY 3.0 AU licence (accessed on 5 September 2014, archived on 15 October 2014).
Media related to Windsor Town Quarry Park and Tramways Substation No. 6 at Wikimedia Commons

Ellen Wheeler

Ellen Wheeler (born October 9, 1961 in Glendale, California) is an American actress, director and producer. She has appeared in several soap operas, including Another World and All My Children. In 1986, she won the Daytime Emmy Award for “Outstanding Ingenue in a Drama Series” for her work as twins Marley and Vicky Love Hudson on Another World. In 1988, she won another Daytime Emmy for “Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Drama Series” for her work as Cindy Parker Chandler on All My Children. Wheeler’s character was one of the first characters with AIDS on daytime television. Wheeler also made a memorable guest appearance as Phyllis Wicke in the 1991 primetime revival of the gothic soap opera Dark Shadows.
In 1996, she starred in the Star Trek: Deep Space Nine episode, “The Quickening”.
In 1998, she briefly reprised the role of Marley on Another World. Rather than have the same actress play the role of both twins, the show made the decision to have Wheeler, the first actress to play the twins, portray Marley, and have actress Jensen Buchanan continue to play Vicky; their differences in appearance (other than a considerable height and build difference which were never addressed) were explained by plastic surgery after Marley was disfigured in a fire.
Wheeler was once married to her Another World costar, Tom Eplin. They were married during the time that their characters “Vicky/Marley” and “Jake” were involved.

During the final season of Another World, Wheeler drew on her stage directorial experience and was invited by Executive Producer, Chris Goutman, to direct a few episodes of Another World. After the cancellation of Another World in 1999, she continued her focus on directing. While continuing to act, she directed several episodes of As the World Turns and finally became part of the directorial team at As the World Turns.
After two seasons with ATWT, Wheeler served for a time an associate producer at another Procter & Gamble serial, Guiding Light. After returning to ATWT and directing the show for several years, she was promoted to Executive Producer of Guiding Light in April 2004, serving until that show’s September 2009 cancellation. Under her direction, the show named a new head writer, David Kreizman, and in 2008, she created a four-person head writing team hermes tassen outlet; in addition to Kreizman, that team includes Lucky Gold, Chris Dunn and executive story editor Jill Lorie Hurst.
Wheeler is credited with Guiding Light’s transition to a new filming method. The show moved away from traditional three-camera filming in a “proscenium” stage setting, and in early 2008 began to broadcast episodes that were recorded on digital cameras. The show rebuilt smaller, more realistic sets in its studio and also used several other sets in a New Jersey town (adjacent to New York City, where GL is produced).
In 2007, Wheeler launched Guiding Light’s 70th anniversary (the longest running show in history) by volunteering her cast and crew on a charity and service campaign known as “Find Your Light”, encouraging viewers to participate alongside actors, directors and crew members in work for the homeless and other deserving groups and individuals across the country.
Wheeler is a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. She lives with her husband and children in New York.
All My Children
Another World
The Bold and the Beautiful
As the World Turns
Dark Shadows
Guiding Light

Pelican Bomb

Launched in February 2011, Pelican Bomb is a contemporary visual arts nonprofit based out of New Orleans. It is dedicated to making New Orleans a supportive place for artists to live and work via its public programming: an online art review, a community supported art program that promotes affordable art sales, a pop-up exhibition program that activates under-utilized and/or vacant spaces in New Orleans, and a critic-in-residence program.
Pelican Bomb’s online publication consists of critical essays, art reviews, and image-based digital content

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. In March 2015, the magazine released an essay written by Ashton Cooper, that used artist Katrina Andry’s exhibition

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, “Indecent Intentions Leave Me Vulnerable and Voiceless” as a lens to explore the recent discussions around street harassment in contemporary visual art.
In December 2014 hermes tassen outlet, Pelican Bomb’s roving exhibition, “Foodways” was featured in the Huffington Post and described as “one of the gems of P.3” by Priscilla Frank. “Foodways” was a part of the Prospect.3 triennial’s local satellite programming and was open from October 25, 2014 through January 25, 2015.
Currently, Pelican Bomb is led by founding editor and executive director, Cameron Shaw and creative and operations director, Amanda Brinkman.

BriSCA Formula 1 Stock Cars National Points Championship

The National Points Championship is a season-long competition for BriSCA Formula 1 Stock Cars. The winner is granted the honour of racing with a silver roof for the following season

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The first season-long championship started in 1956. Drivers’ scores at every stock car meeting were recorded to create the championship table. During the late 1990s, when Frankie Wainman Junior dominated, there was criticism that the National Points Championship was predictable and favoured drivers who had the money to race at as many meetings as possible. The National Series was created in 2002. Rather than the points accumulated over the entire season counting towards the winner, the National Series was competed for over 35 designated meetings. The season-long National Points Championship survived, but its importance was downgraded, and the privilege of racing with a silver roof for the following season was transferred from it to the National Series.
In 2009, the National Series was amended. This time, the top ten points-scoring drivers over the first two-thirds of the season were entered in the National Series Shootout, beginning with no points except for a small number of meeting attendance points. The drivers raced over ten designated Shootout rounds, with the points scored in them deciding the winner of the National Series. In 2010, the number of competing drivers was increased to twelve. From 2012, the National Series Shootout was rebranded the National Points Championship Shootout.
The most successful drivers in National Points Championships and National Series are Stuart Smith and Frankie Wainman Junior, who have both won thirteen. Other notable multiple winners include John Lund (six), Fred Mitchell (three), Andy Smith (three) and Frankie Wainman (three) hermes tassen outlet.